<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40"><head><meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 15 (filtered medium)"><style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:Helvetica;
        panose-1:2 11 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Helvetica;
        panose-1:2 11 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0cm;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:11.0pt;
        font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;
        mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:#0563C1;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:#954F72;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        mso-margin-top-alt:auto;
        margin-right:0cm;
        mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
        margin-left:0cm;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman",serif;}
span.EmailStyle17
        {mso-style-type:personal-compose;
        font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;
        color:windowtext;}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;
        font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;
        mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}
@page WordSection1
        {size:612.0pt 792.0pt;
        margin:70.85pt 70.85pt 70.85pt 70.85pt;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]--></head><body lang=HU link="#0563C1" vlink="#954F72"><div class=WordSection1><p style='mso-margin-top-alt:0cm;margin-right:0cm;margin-bottom:4.5pt;margin-left:0cm;line-height:14.5pt;background:white'><span style='font-size:10.5pt;font-family:"Helvetica",sans-serif;color:#141823'>Double Aphrodite and the dangers of beauty<o:p></o:p></span></p><p style='mso-margin-top-alt:4.5pt;margin-right:0cm;margin-bottom:4.5pt;margin-left:0cm;line-height:14.5pt;background:white;orphans: auto;text-align:start;widows: 1;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;word-spacing:0px'><span style='font-size:10.5pt;font-family:"Helvetica",sans-serif;color:#141823'>Unn Irene Aasdalen<br>(Nansenskolen-Norsk Humanistisk Akademi, Lillehammer, Norvégia)<o:p></o:p></span></p><p style='mso-margin-top-alt:0cm;margin-right:0cm;margin-bottom:4.5pt;margin-left:0cm;line-height:14.5pt;background:white'><span style='font-size:10.5pt;font-family:"Helvetica",sans-serif;color:#141823'>2016. március 2., szerda, du. 4 óra<br>ELTE BTK Filozófia Intézet, Intézeti Tanácsterem (I épület, I. emelet 122-123)<o:p></o:p></span></p><p style='mso-margin-top-alt:4.5pt;margin-right:0cm;margin-bottom:4.5pt;margin-left:0cm;line-height:14.5pt;background:white'><span style='font-size:10.5pt;font-family:"Helvetica",sans-serif;color:#141823'>In Plato’s Symposium Pausanias explains that Love and Aphrodite are inseparable (Symposium 180c). If therefore, Aphrodite were a single goddess, there could also be a single Love. But, since there are two goddesses of that name, there are also two kinds of Love. In the Italian High Renaissance Neoplatonists generally agreed that there were two kinds of love, heavenly and vulgar, but the exact role of Aphrodite was much disputed. Marsilio Ficino honoured in his De amore (from 1469) higher Aphrodite, but assured that lower Aphrodite had an important role in the hierarchy of being. His younger contemporary, Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, disagreed. His love theory from Commento sopra una canzone d’amore (1486) argued that man had to choose either vulgar Aphrodite or heavenly Aphrodite, he couldn’t have both. Pico warned against the dangers of Aphrodite. Their disagreement had a wide range of consequences, and will be discussed in this paper.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p style='mso-margin-top-alt:4.5pt;margin-right:0cm;margin-bottom:4.5pt;margin-left:0cm;line-height:14.5pt;background:white'><span style='font-size:10.5pt;font-family:"Helvetica",sans-serif;color:#141823'>Unn Irene Aasdalen, is director of Nansen Academy, the Norwegian Humanistic Academy at Lillehammer. Chairs the Nordic Network for Renaissance Studies, NNRS. Her Ph.D. in Intellectual History from the University of London, Royal Holloway College (2008) had the title “Climbing Diotima’s Ladder: Marsilio Ficino, Giovanni Pico della Mirandola and Lorenzo de’ Medici, Their Neoplatonic Commentaries in Italian”. Her main interest is Italian Renaissance philosophy, and she has mainly published articles on Machiavelli, Tullia d’Aragona, Pico and Ficino. She recently published a book in Norwegian on love-treatises in the Italian Renaissance, Den gjenfødte Eros (Oslo, Scandinavian Academic Publishing: 2014)<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><o:p> </o:p></p></div></body></html>