<div dir="ltr"><div><div>Kedves Kollégák!<br><br>Az MTA BTK Filozófiai Intézetének Tudománytörténet és Tudományfilozófia 
Kutatócsoportja<br>
2015. október 13-án 16 órai kezdettel szeretettel meghívja Önöket<br>
<br>Prof. Karl Ulrich Mayer (Yale University / Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung): 
"From Weber's "Science as Vocation" (1917) to Horizon 2020"<br>
<br>
című előadására. <br>Az előadás helyszíne: 1014 Budapest, Országház u. 30., Pepita terem.<br><br></div><div>Az előadás absztraktja:<br><span><span><span class=""><span><span><br><span>With
 articles 179 to 190 of the Treaty of Lisbon of 2010 the European Union 
received a general mandate in the area of scientific research and for 
the formation of a European Research Union. Its main current carrier is 
the 8th framework for funding research, better known as “Horizon 2020” 
providing more than 70 billion Euros of funds for a period of 7 years. 
Almost one hundred years ago Max Weber provided an analysis of how the 
organisation of science impinges upon the motives of researchers and how
 the latter are related to its quality. What are the purposes of the 
European programs and how do they concern the motives of the individual 
researchers and the quality of EU-funded research today? In my lecture I
 will contrast Max Weber`s sociological view of science with its modern 
“European” counterpart and - on that basis – raise some fundamental 
critical concerns. EU science suffers from an overload of goals, 
bureaucracy and policies , a consequent waste of resources and is 
lacking an adequate institutional structure. What we need are 
institutional designs for European research funding which allow for 
three things: first, clarity of purpose; second, protection from direct 
political influence; and third, an institutional commitment to the 
values of science.<br><br></span></span></span></span></span></span></div>Üdvözlettel,<br></div>Sivadó Ákos</div>