<html><head><meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8"><META name="Author" content="Novell GroupWise WebAccess"></head><body style='font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; '> <meta content="text/html; charset=utf-8" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <meta name="GENERATOR" content="MSHTML 11.00.9600.16521">  <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: center; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none" align="center"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><font face="Times New Roman">The CEU Department of Philosophy cordially invites you to a talk <o:p></o:p></font></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: center; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none" align="center"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><font face="Times New Roman">(as part of its Departmental Colloquium series)<o:p></o:p></font></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: center; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none" align="center"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><font face="Times New Roman">by<o:p></o:p></font></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: center; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none" align="center"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><a href="http://ias.ceu.hu/Virag"><font face="Times New Roman"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal"><span style="TEXT-DECORATION: none; COLOR: windowtext; text-underline: none">Curie Virag</span></b><span style="TEXT-DECORATION: none; COLOR: windowtext; text-underline: none"> (CEU, University of Toronto)</span></font></a><o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: center; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none" align="center"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><o:p><font face="Times New Roman"></font></o:p></span> </p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: center; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none" align="center"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><font face="Times New Roman">on<o:p></o:p></font></span></p> <h1 style="TEXT-ALIGN: center; MARGIN: 24pt 0in 0pt" align="center"><font size="5"><span style="FONT-FAMILY: "Times New Roman","serif"">`Double-vision and the Perspective of the Sage in Early China`</span><span style="FONT-FAMILY: "Times New Roman","serif"; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman""><o:p></o:p></span></font></h1> <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: center; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none" align="center"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><o:p><font face="Times New Roman"> </font></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: center; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none" align="center"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><font face="Times New Roman">Tuesday, 18 November 2014, 5.30 PM, Zrinyi 14, Room 412<o:p></o:p></font></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><o:p><font face="Times New Roman"> </font></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><o:p><font face="Times New Roman"> </font></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><font face="Times New Roman">ABSTRACT<o:p></o:p></font></span></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><o:p><font face="Times New Roman"> </font></o:p></span></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: justify; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><font face="Times New Roman">A striking and recurring theme in early Chinese philosophy is the idea that the perfect knowing of the sage is characterized by double-vision. Although different texts ascribe different combinations of perspectives to this doubleness – inside and outside, immediate and transcendent, emotionally engaged and detached – the basic idea is that the optimal point of view is provided by the capacity to embody two distinct vantage points, the one personal and particular, the other impartial and universal. Tracing this theme in early Daoist and Confucian writings (primarly the <i>Zhuangzi </i>and <i>Xunzi</i>) and in later philosophy and visual practice, I will discuss what such an account of sagely vision entailed, how it endeavored to negotiate between objective and subjective points of view, and what it reveals about the distinct character of early Chinese ethics and conceptions of knowing. </font></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: justify; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><font face="Times New Roman"></font></span> </p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="TEXT-ALIGN: justify; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-AUTOSPACE: ; mso-layout-grid-align: none"><span style="FONT-SIZE: 14pt"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal"><o:p></o:p></b></span> </p></body></html>