<br><br>
<div class="gmail_quote">
<div>
<p align="center"><font face="Calibri, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><span style="FONT-SIZE:11pt">The <i>Journal of Early Modern Studies</i> is seeking contributions for its first issue (Fall 2012). It will be a special issue, devoted to the theme: </span></font>
<p><font face="Calibri, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><span style="FONT-SIZE:11pt"></span></font>
<p align="center"><font face="Calibri, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><font size="4"><span style="FONT-SIZE:14pt">Shaping the Republic of Letters: Communication, Correspondence and Networks in Early Modern Europe<br></span></font><span style="FONT-SIZE:11pt"><br>
Editor: Vlad Alexandrescu<br> <br>  </span></font>
<p><font face="Calibri, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><span style="FONT-SIZE:11pt">A well known metaphor of the early European modernity and an important instrument in the understanding of seventeenth-century thought, the “Republic of Letters” was, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, primarily a label for new projects of intellectual and scientific association.  Various models for the Republic of Letters have been investigated and described as closed circles or open networks, shaped around a variety of elements: scientific societies, intellectual networks, formal or informal circles of intellectuals, proponents of the new and old philosophies. What all such models had in common was an ideal of shaping communities around a moral, intellectual and sometimes a religious project. <br>
 <br>This special issue of the <i>Journal of Early Modern Studies</i> (<i>JEMS</i>) aims to bring together articles devoted to the investigation of such models of early modern communities governed by the ideal of the Republic of Letters. The journal is particularly seeking papers dedicated to the exploration of various ways of disseminating and communicating knowledge within the Republic of Letters, with a special focus on the exchanges between the East and the West of Europe.<br>
 <br><i>JEMS</i> is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal of intellectual history, dedicated to the exploration of the interactions between philosophy, science and religion in Early Modern Europe. It is edited by the Research Centre “Foundations of Modern Thought”, University of Bucharest, and published and distributed by Zeta Books. For further information on <i>JEMS</i> and its first issue, please visit <a href="http://www.zetabooks.com/journal-of-early-modern-studies.html" target="_blank">http://www.zetabooks.com/journal-of-early-modern-studies.html</a>.<br>
 <br>The first issue is scheduled for the Fall of 2012. Please send your contributions no later than the 30th of April 2012 to <a href="http://jems@zetabooks.com" target="_blank">jems@zetabooks.com</a>.<br> <br> <br><br><br>
</span></font><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Pavlovits Tamás<br><br>egyetemi docens<br>SZTE BTK Filozófia Tanszék<br>6722 Szeged<br>Petőfi S. sgt. 30-34.<br></p></p></p></p></div></div>