<HTML xmlns:o = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:st1 = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags"><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.6000.17102" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY style="MARGIN: 4px 4px 1px; FONT: 10pt Tahoma">
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman">The CEU Department of Philosophy cordially invites you to a talk <o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman">(as part of its Departmental Colloquium series)<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman">by<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman">Aaron Lambert (<st1:place w:st="on"><st1:PlaceType w:st="on">University</st1:PlaceType> of <st1:PlaceName w:st="on">Chicago</st1:PlaceName></st1:place>)<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></B></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman">on<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman">`What are the prospects for a science-friendly mind-body dualism? `<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></B></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><o:p><FONT face="Times New Roman"> </FONT></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman">Tuesday, 21 February, 2012, 5.30 PM, Zrinyi 14, Room 412<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><o:p><FONT face="Times New Roman"> </FONT></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman">ABSTRACT<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman">The causal completeness of the physical domain has usually been seen as a tough nut for the interactionist dualist to crack.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </SPAN>If every physical event or state has a sufficient physical cause, i.e., if the physical domain is what I call 'minimally complete,' then the dualist is faced with what looks to be an unacceptable dilemma.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </SPAN>Either mental events never cause any physical events at all, so interactionism is false, or mental events overdetermine the physical events they cause, so interactionism, if not exactly false, is not respectable.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </SPAN>The dualist's usual response is to beat a retreat and reject the completeness of the physical domain.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </SPAN>The prospects for a science-friendly dualism look dim.<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><o:p><FONT face="Times New Roman"> </FONT></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman">In this presentation I argue, first, that though completeness seems to threaten mental efficacy, denying completeness doesn't lead anywhere useful for the dualist.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </SPAN>The solution to the problem of mental causation lies elsewhere.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </SPAN>Second, minimal completeness is an important principle whose rejection is not be taken lightly.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </SPAN>And third, dualists are misguided to think they need to beat a retreat in the first place, for dualists can have their cake and eat it too.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </SPAN>Physical completeness can be left standing alongside the principle that mental events are genuine causes of physical events. There is a way of putting physical completeness and mental efficacy together that leads neither to an unsustainable tension between mental and physical causation, nor to the temptation to regard mental events as causally redundant because physical events 'already do all the work'.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </SPAN>The prospects for a science-friendly dualism do not look so bad after all.<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><o:p><FONT face="Times New Roman"> </FONT></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><o:p><FONT face="Times New Roman"></FONT></o:p></SPAN> </P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"><o:p></o:p></SPAN> </P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"> </P>Kriszta Biber<BR>Department Coordinator<BR>Philosophy Department<BR>Tel: 36-1-327-3806<BR>Fax: 36-1-327-3072<BR>E-mail: biberk@ceu.hu</BODY></HTML>