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Philosophy of Science

Hungarian title: Tudományfilozófia

This semester the lectures will be given in English


lecture course
Wed 14:00-15:30, Room 129 (Múzeum krt. 4/i)

The first class of the course: September 21.

Codes:

BMA-LOTD-205.03
BBN-FIL-401.14
TANM-FIL-401.11
BBN-FIL-315.11
BMI-LOTD-205E.03
BBV-020.24
BMVD-020.04

Those who take this lecture course  with code BBN-FIL-315 also need to take the seminar course of code BBN-FIL-316.

The course provides an introduction to modern analytic philosophy of science. I shall focus on the central epistemological problems concerning empirical sciences like physics; and I shall discuss these issues on a formal/logical basis. Finally I sketch a naturalized philosophy of science based on what I call physico-formalist philosophy of mathematics -- an account for scientific knowledge, both a priori and empirical, within a purely physicalist ontology. 

Main topics:

  • characterization of scientific knowledge

  • science in social context

  • traditional methodology of empirical science

  • skepticism concerning empirical knowledge

  • truth of fact vs. truth of reasoning dichotomy

  • the Kantian tradition

  • philosophy of logic and mathematics

  • scientific theory as partially interpreted formal system

  • semantics of scientific theory

  • the physicalist approach

  • meaning and truth

  • holistic conclusions

  • operationalism and the constitutive a priori

  • empirical underdetermination

  • scientific knowledge in the context of the natural world




Readings:
  1. Samir Okasha: Philosophy of Science - A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press 2002
  2. Laki János: Empirikus adatok, metodológia, gondolkodás és nyelv a XX. századi tudományfilozófiában, inTudományfilozófia, Laki János szerk., Osiris, Budapest 1998.
  3. Thomas Uebel: Vienna Circle, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2013 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.) (http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/vienna-circle/)
  4. John Vickers: The Problem of Induction, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2013 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.) (http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/induction-problem/)
  5. Robert Sinclair: Quine’s Philosophy of Science, Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (http://www.iep.utm.edu/quine-sc)
  6. L. E. Szabó: Mathematical facts in a physicalist ontology, Parallel Processing Letters, 22 (2012) 1240009 (12 pages), DOI: 10.1142/S0129626412400099 [preprint]
  7. L. E. Szabó: Formal Systems as Physical Objects: A Physicalist Account of Mathematical Truth, International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, 17 (2003) pp. 117 – 125 (preprint: PDF)
  8. Vázlatpontok a fizikai elméletek fizikalista értelmezéséhez, In Zvolenszky Zs. et al. (szerk.), Nehogy érvgyűlölők legyünk -- Tanulmánykötet Máté András 60. születésnapjára, L'Harmattan, Bp. 2013, p. 122--129. (PDF)
  9. T. Kuhn: Scientific Revolutions, in The Philosophy of Science, R. Boyd et al. (eds.), MIT Press 1991, pp. 139-157.
  10. Széljegyzetek Kuhn könyvéhez (E. Szabó): 

Records and the slides of the lectures will be available.

Credit requirements
:
  • Philosophy undergraduates: Reading 1 + the main material of the lectures
  • Science Faculty and Computer Science Faculty students: the main material of the lectures
  • PhD and MA students must prepare from Readings 1,3,4,5,6,7,9 + the complete material of the lectures, including the more formal approaches too.
  • PhD students, in addition, must write a 5-10 page critical essay (in English) in connection with the main theses I am proposing in the lecture course.


2015-05-31


Archives


  

Records and slides







Hempel
Schlick


Hilbert
Fine


Ayer
Grünbaum


Gödel
Russell


Bell
Salmon


Carnap
Kant


Kuhn
Lakatos


Cartwright
Lewis

Hume
Reichenbach


Einstein
Friedman


Poincaré
Van Fraassen


Hahn
Mach


Putnam
Quine


Popper
Earman



 
2008